Justice Department needs a few good hackers

Shutterstock image: looking for code.

WHAT: The Department of Justice is on the hunt for a contractor to staff its network defense organization JSOC -- the Justice Security Operations Center.

WHY: According to a recent "sources sought" notice, the JSOC needs assistance in conducting vulnerability testing on Justice Department networks – basically trying to find security flaws before the bad guys get there. Such testing helps harden networks, and also provides material for certifying network security as required by law.

Vendors who fit the bill will be able to provide penetration testing, incident response and defensive assessments, as well as intelligence services. Intelligence includes reports on existing attack methods being used by cyber adversaries, as well as analysis to identify systems and nodes that have been compromised by previous attacks. Finally, the department is seeking a contractor who can monitor cloud environments, both government and commercial service providers.

Click here to read the full notice.

Posted by Adam Mazmanian on Jun 15, 2015 at 10:37 AM


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