Air Force plans insider threats program

Shutterstock image (by GlebStock): hacker with graphic user interface.

(GlebStock / Shutterstock)

WHAT: An integrated insider threat capability for the U.S. Air Force.

WHY: Insider threat is a catchall term that encompasses Edward Snowden and the shooters at Fort Hood in Texas and the Navy Yard in Washington, D.C. The government has tried to accelerate efforts to detect potential threats, whether to classified information or the safety of personnel. The Air Force is seeking to procure a program that integrates data from around the service and external data like criminal and credit reports in order to identify anomalous behavior.

The government has already put out a set of minimum standards for insider threat programs. A big part of the program is IT. Personnel records, user data from monitoring Air Force computer systems and other data streams have to be fed into a central hub. With a baseline for normal use of networks and typical use of facilities, an insider threat program can raise alarm bells when anomalous behavior is detected. The Air Force hopes to have a plan in place by November 2015.

Click here to read the full solicitation.

Posted by Adam Mazmanian on Aug 14, 2015 at 9:35 AM


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