OPM wants to know who can manage electronic records

Shutterstock image: digital records overlay.

WHAT: An Office of Personnel Management sources sought notice for support of its electronic Official Personnel Folder.

WHY: The eOPF is the master record of a federal employee’s service, used by both OPM and agency human resources departments to track employee rights, benefits and entitlements throughout a career.

OPM is seeking information from potential vendors that could handle development, program management and data management support for eOPF, which is used by more than 100 federal agencies, tracks 2.5 million federal employees and is built on Northrop Grumman’s ePower platform.

(Interested vendors will need to provide verification from Northrop Grumman that they’re an ePower authorized service provider.)

The incumbent, Northrop Grumman, handles a broader spate of OPM work; the sources sought notice estimates the particular support work broken out here is worth $6.5 to $7 million.

The current contract expires Aug. 23, and OPM anticipates issuing an official request for proposals and making an award between Aug. 11 and Aug. 23.

All responses are due to Kristin Blackmore (Kristin.Blackmore@opm.gov) by noon EDT on Aug. 10.

Posted by Zach Noble on Aug 07, 2015 at 8:07 AM


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