How State wants to innovate

Shutterstock / Pictofigo 

WHAT: A State Department innovation platform

WHY: The technology at the State Department is notoriously creaky and out-of-date. One of the minor disclosures from former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's email systems was a 2011 suggestion from a colleague that the agency's "antiquated" tech could be the subject of an op-ed column.

The State Department is looking to blow the dust out of its hallowed halls and embrace digital innovation, as a means to support collaboration, develop new tools and encourage the adoption of web-based services that can be acquired at little or no cost.

In a new request for information, the State Department’s Office of Global Partnerships is casting a wide net for ideas about hackathons, crowdsourcing, brainstorming, improving user experience and developing digital tools to help diplomats do more with less.

"Our vision is to modernize the way the Department engages in diplomacy by institutionalizing private sector collaboration across bureaus and missions within the Department through a web-based one-stop resource center that captures our range of services and technical assistance, as well as provides offices guidance on how to integrate and implement innovative tools and practices (e.g. challenges, competitions, crowd sourcing, etc.) within their missions," the RFI reads.

State is looking to industry for a platform that can support all these services and scale to a global user base. Replies are due June 12.

Click here to read the full RFI.

Posted by Adam Mazmanian on Jun 01, 2017 at 5:52 PM


Featured

  • Comment
    Diverse Workforce (Image: Shutterstock)

    Who cares if you wear a hoodie or a suit? It’s the mission that matters most

    Responding to Steve Kelman's recent blog post, Alan Thomas shares the inside story on 18F's evolution.

  • Cybersecurity
    enterprise security (Omelchenko/Shutterstock.com)

    Does Einstein need a post-SolarWinds makeover?

    A marquee program designed to protect the government against cybersecurity threats is facing new scrutiny in the wake of Solar Winds Orion breach, but analysts say the program was unlikely to have ever stopped the hacking campaign.

Stay Connected