Workforce Wonk

By Alyah Khan

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Is this really the best time to ask about feds' job satisfaction?

In the middle of a chaotic week that could end with the federal government shutting down, the Office of Personnel Management decided to launch its 2011 Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey.

The survey measures employees’ perceptions of success in their agencies in areas of organizational climate, culture and engagement.

But, based on feedback from FCW readers, feds don’t appear particularly happy about what’s going on in government these days and are inclined to express their concerns.

If the government shuts down April 8, roughly 800,000 employees would be affected and those deemed “non-excepted” would be furloughed, which raises the question: Is this the best time to be assessing how feds feel about their jobs?

And, even if Congress is able to reach a funding agreement for fiscal 2011, has the possibility of a shutdown caused enough anxiety to affect an employee’s long-term outlook?

According to OPM, participants will answer questions concerning experiences with their work unit and agency, as well as their views on their supervisor/manager and agency leaders.

Approximately 550,000 employees will be invited to participate in the survey between April and May. Survey results will be available sometime this summer.

Will you use the EVS to share your frustration about this year’s budget debate? How do you think the current environment might affect feds’ perspectives?

Posted by Alyah Khan on Apr 06, 2011 at 12:20 PM


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