IoT poses special cyber risks

Internet-connected devices pose special risks for federal agencies, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology is developing guidance to meet the need.

IoT
 

Internet-connected devices pose special risks for federal agencies, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology is developing guidance to meet the need.

Connected sensors, smart-building technology, drones and autonomous vehicles can't be managed in the same way as traditional IT, according to a NIST draft publication, Considerations for Managing Internet of Things (IoT) Cybersecurity and Privacy Risks. The document points out that basic cybersecurity capabilities often aren't available in IoT devices.

Federal agencies must “consider that IoT presents challenges in achieving those [cybersecurity] outcomes or there are challenges that IoT may present in achieving security controls -- and we wanted to highlight those,” Katerina Megas, program manager for NIST's Cybersecurity for Internet of Things program, told FCW at the Internet of Things Global Summit on Oct. 4.

"We felt putting out something initial on IoT was the most important -- to get something out as quickly as possible," she said. "There will be plans in the future to get more focused, more specialized."

One of NIST's next steps is to develop a potential baseline of cybersecurity standards for IoT devices, she said.

NIST is accepting comments on the draft through Oct. 24. Before a final version is published, Megas said, "we plan on starting to release iterative discussion documents to talk about if there were a baseline for IoT devices."

Robert S. Metzger, a government contracting attorney at Rogers Joseph O'Donnell, said that the federal government is exposed to the security and privacy risks of the IoT ecosystem through relationships with vendors.

"The IoT is all over us whether we know it or not,"  Metzger said. "Even if government is not buying it, so many surfaces upon which government depends are using it. Vendors are using it, and so the government becomes, if you will, not so much a hostage but among those exposed to the IoT deployment by commercial enterprises."

Although the IoT creates new and more attack surfaces for potential bad actors, and it opens up both networks and hardware to potential threats, that doesn’t mean it should be shunned, Metzger said at the conference.

One place the government can begin to ask for better security is in the procurement process for these technologies, according to Tom McDermott, the deputy assistant secretary of cyber policy at the Department of Homeland Security.

"We are always looking to think about how we can use federal procurement authority and federal procurement power to drive better cybersecurity outcomes," McDermott said.

A bill proposed by Sens. Mark Warner (D-Va.) and Cory Gardner (R-Colo.) last year would impose basic cybersecurity standards on IoT devices procured by the federal government, including changeable passwords and a requirement that software and firmware be patchable. So far, the bill hasn't advanced, although a companion measure was introduced in the House of Representatives.

Separately, NIST put out a call in April for ideas on lightweight encryption, with an eye to developing security measures that could be deployed on resource-constrained IoT devices.

X
This website uses cookies to enhance user experience and to analyze performance and traffic on our website. We also share information about your use of our site with our social media, advertising and analytics partners. Learn More / Do Not Sell My Personal Information
Accept Cookies
X
Cookie Preferences Cookie List

Do Not Sell My Personal Information

When you visit our website, we store cookies on your browser to collect information. The information collected might relate to you, your preferences or your device, and is mostly used to make the site work as you expect it to and to provide a more personalized web experience. However, you can choose not to allow certain types of cookies, which may impact your experience of the site and the services we are able to offer. Click on the different category headings to find out more and change our default settings according to your preference. You cannot opt-out of our First Party Strictly Necessary Cookies as they are deployed in order to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting the cookie banner and remembering your settings, to log into your account, to redirect you when you log out, etc.). For more information about the First and Third Party Cookies used please follow this link.

Allow All Cookies

Manage Consent Preferences

Strictly Necessary Cookies - Always Active

We do not allow you to opt-out of our certain cookies, as they are necessary to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting our cookie banner and remembering your privacy choices) and/or to monitor site performance. These cookies are not used in a way that constitutes a “sale” of your data under the CCPA. You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not work as intended if you do so. You can usually find these settings in the Options or Preferences menu of your browser. Visit www.allaboutcookies.org to learn more.

Sale of Personal Data, Targeting & Social Media Cookies

Under the California Consumer Privacy Act, you have the right to opt-out of the sale of your personal information to third parties. These cookies collect information for analytics and to personalize your experience with targeted ads. You may exercise your right to opt out of the sale of personal information by using this toggle switch. If you opt out we will not be able to offer you personalised ads and will not hand over your personal information to any third parties. Additionally, you may contact our legal department for further clarification about your rights as a California consumer by using this Exercise My Rights link

If you have enabled privacy controls on your browser (such as a plugin), we have to take that as a valid request to opt-out. Therefore we would not be able to track your activity through the web. This may affect our ability to personalize ads according to your preferences.

Targeting cookies may be set through our site by our advertising partners. They may be used by those companies to build a profile of your interests and show you relevant adverts on other sites. They do not store directly personal information, but are based on uniquely identifying your browser and internet device. If you do not allow these cookies, you will experience less targeted advertising.

Social media cookies are set by a range of social media services that we have added to the site to enable you to share our content with your friends and networks. They are capable of tracking your browser across other sites and building up a profile of your interests. This may impact the content and messages you see on other websites you visit. If you do not allow these cookies you may not be able to use or see these sharing tools.

If you want to opt out of all of our lead reports and lists, please submit a privacy request at our Do Not Sell page.

Save Settings
Cookie Preferences Cookie List

Cookie List

A cookie is a small piece of data (text file) that a website – when visited by a user – asks your browser to store on your device in order to remember information about you, such as your language preference or login information. Those cookies are set by us and called first-party cookies. We also use third-party cookies – which are cookies from a domain different than the domain of the website you are visiting – for our advertising and marketing efforts. More specifically, we use cookies and other tracking technologies for the following purposes:

Strictly Necessary Cookies

We do not allow you to opt-out of our certain cookies, as they are necessary to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting our cookie banner and remembering your privacy choices) and/or to monitor site performance. These cookies are not used in a way that constitutes a “sale” of your data under the CCPA. You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not work as intended if you do so. You can usually find these settings in the Options or Preferences menu of your browser. Visit www.allaboutcookies.org to learn more.

Functional Cookies

We do not allow you to opt-out of our certain cookies, as they are necessary to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting our cookie banner and remembering your privacy choices) and/or to monitor site performance. These cookies are not used in a way that constitutes a “sale” of your data under the CCPA. You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not work as intended if you do so. You can usually find these settings in the Options or Preferences menu of your browser. Visit www.allaboutcookies.org to learn more.

Performance Cookies

We do not allow you to opt-out of our certain cookies, as they are necessary to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting our cookie banner and remembering your privacy choices) and/or to monitor site performance. These cookies are not used in a way that constitutes a “sale” of your data under the CCPA. You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not work as intended if you do so. You can usually find these settings in the Options or Preferences menu of your browser. Visit www.allaboutcookies.org to learn more.

Sale of Personal Data

We also use cookies to personalize your experience on our websites, including by determining the most relevant content and advertisements to show you, and to monitor site traffic and performance, so that we may improve our websites and your experience. You may opt out of our use of such cookies (and the associated “sale” of your Personal Information) by using this toggle switch. You will still see some advertising, regardless of your selection. Because we do not track you across different devices, browsers and GEMG properties, your selection will take effect only on this browser, this device and this website.

Social Media Cookies

We also use cookies to personalize your experience on our websites, including by determining the most relevant content and advertisements to show you, and to monitor site traffic and performance, so that we may improve our websites and your experience. You may opt out of our use of such cookies (and the associated “sale” of your Personal Information) by using this toggle switch. You will still see some advertising, regardless of your selection. Because we do not track you across different devices, browsers and GEMG properties, your selection will take effect only on this browser, this device and this website.

Targeting Cookies

We also use cookies to personalize your experience on our websites, including by determining the most relevant content and advertisements to show you, and to monitor site traffic and performance, so that we may improve our websites and your experience. You may opt out of our use of such cookies (and the associated “sale” of your Personal Information) by using this toggle switch. You will still see some advertising, regardless of your selection. Because we do not track you across different devices, browsers and GEMG properties, your selection will take effect only on this browser, this device and this website.